Thursday, September 11, 2008

A Moment of Silence In Memory of One Of Our Own: Remembering Ramzi Doany

I didn't know Ramzi personally. But, as I'm sure you all know, Amman is a VERY small town. It's so small that when the World Trade Center was destroyed on September 11, 2001, one of our own was lost. Ramzi was not only from Jordan, he was not only Palestinian, he was not only Christian, he was a member of our family. Although we weren't related (even by marriage), we were related by faith, by worship, by practice. Ramzi was one of those American myths, the forgotten, the glossed over: the Palestinian Christian...

And when those planes went down, I listened to little-thinking colleagues talk about "those Palestinians" who were rejoicing. I explained that "those Palestinians" were mourning one of their sons. You would be foolish to think that out of nearly 3000 people, a Palestinian wasn't killed. We heard from Teta and Jiddo Bean that Ramzi was in the building. We mourned from afar for Ramzi and his family, who we were sure must miss him terribly.

So, this year, a timely reminder from Tim (I never even know the date anymore) made me want to do more than just remember my horror watching the towers fall. It made me want to do more than remember my relief that El 3atal's project in the WTC had ended in May and he wasn't there. So I stumbled upon Project 2,996 and felt that a tribute to Ramzi would be the right thing to do. He gave me the opportunity to gently rebuke Americans caught up in the post 9/11 emotionalism. He gave me the chance to humanize Palestinians at a time when so many I knew needed that. He has given me so much.


Ramzi had a great sense of humor. He was known within his family for it and even used it to cover his own academic shortcomings. His sister reflected on a time when “As a child, Ramzi once dug a hole in our backyard for a terrible report card he had received and placed a headstone on top,” “When our parents asked for the report card, Ramzi explained to them that, “it was dead and buried!”
He loved family, he loved to read, he loved to cook. But mostly, it seems to me, he loved his family. He took his sister's children to play sports, he cooked Thanksgiving turkeys, he treated friends like family. Ramzi was expecting delivery of a Harley Davidson in April or May 2002. Unfortunately, Ramzi would never receive his motorcycle. His life was cut short.
And, so this year, I ask each of you to observe a moment of silence for Ramzi today. At 9:11pm, turn off the TV, suspend your conversation, and reflect on our fallen brother. In this fish bowl that is Amman, let's give Ramzi a tribute on this anniversary of his death. Let's say we remember you. We won't forget you. We miss you. And it's equally true, whether we knew you or not.
And, for Ramzi's family who is still here, know that our hearts are with you today. I pray that God will give you peace knowing that Ramzi is with him and you will see him again...
Happy Remembrances!

10 Comments:

At 1:48 AM , Blogger NasEr said...

Its always heart breaking when innocent people are killed .
I feel with his family .may they be strong and feeling peace .

 
At 1:56 AM , Anonymous kinzi said...

Great post, and great idea. We will be remembering...and praying.

 
At 1:59 AM , Blogger MommaBean said...

Naser and Kinzi, thanks for reembering with me.

 
At 2:17 AM , Anonymous tim said...

Your post was very moving. I will take the time today to remember Ramzy and his family.
The Palestinian Christian is indeed the loch ness of people groups... there is rumor of its existence but nobody really gives it a second thought. It is relegated to just a fleeting thought wiped away like that stuff that gathers at the corners of your mouth after sleeping.

Blessings to Ramzy's family. Thank you MommaBean for bringing him to the forefront of our thoughts.

tim

 
At 2:39 AM , Anonymous tim said...

on another quick note...

I agree that there is a "those palestinians" mentality in America. Sad to say. «sarcasm» Luckily, the media doesn't sensationalize anything... like showing people dancing in the streets and handing out candy. «/sarcasm» Did that happen in some neighborhoods in Gaza... yeah probably... but that is no reason to generalize like that.
I have an American friend that lived in the Strip during 9/11 and his phone was busy non-stop for hours. He would hang up from one call with a Gazan friend passing along his condolences, to have the phone ring immediately to another friend who had been hitting redial repeatedly until the line was free. This went on for hours. Gazans reaching out.

Shame on the American media for throwing an unfavorable spin and jacking it all up like usual.

I think I could get a neighborhood to dance in the streets if I had enough konaafa.

tim

 
At 10:34 AM , Anonymous Marti said...

That was a beautiful and moving tribute. Thank you for sharing and helping us all remember what a tragedy that day was and how many innocent people of the world lost their lives. God bless you for taking the time to write this.

 
At 12:20 PM , Blogger MommaBean said...

Thanks, Tim. I think Teta and Jiddo Bean will be reaching out to the family tonight and TetaBean reads the blog, so I know she'll pass along your blessings. Shame on the American media indeed.

Marti, welcome to my blog and thanks for your kind words...

 
At 4:06 PM , Blogger Teena in Toronto said...

Thank you for your tribute!

I posted one too.

 
At 5:05 PM , Anonymous Qwaider قويدر said...

Very touching.


May they rest in peace

 
At 11:10 PM , Blogger MommaBean said...

Welcome Teena and thanks for your tribute to another victim. Q, thanks for visiting and thanks for your prayer...

 

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